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Famous Women in Mount Hope Cemetery

1. Lucy Read Anthony

Lucy Read Anthony was the mother of Susan B. Anthony. If you enjoy interesting love stories, read how she married Daniel Anthony, a Quaker, even though it meant giving up the singing and dancing that she loved so much. Mrs. Anthony always supported Susan and the rest of the family as they worked to make our country a better place.

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2. Mary Anthony

If you would like to celebrate a brave unsung hero, read about Mary Anthony, the youngest sister of Susan B. Anthony. Susan said, "Without Mary, my work would have been impossible." Mary was a teacher and later a principal in Rochester.

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3. Harriet Benton Bentley

Harriet died in the terrible Spanish Flu Epidemic in 1918 when she was only 32 years old. She had come to Rochester to marry her lawyer fiancé, and they had 4 daughters. Harriet started a preschool in Rochester which eventually became today's Harley School. If you want to choose a woman who loves children, who is a great athlete and outdoors person, you will be fascinated by the life of Harriet Bentley.

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4. Helen Warren Brown

Helen Warren Brown died at age 29 in Paris, France. You may choose to read about her monument which is filled with symbols of affection and grief, such as a rose for eternal love and a cutoff tree trunk for a life too short. If you are especially interested in memorial symbols, this monument to a lost wife is an excellent choice.

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5. Adelaide Crapsey

Do you enjoy reading and writing poetry? If so, you might choose to learn about Adelaide Crapsey who grew up in Rochester. She was a tragic young poet who dressed all in gray when she taught at SmithCollege. After a short time there, she became ill. She died in her mid-thirties, a life sadly cut short.

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6. Rhoda DeGarmo

Rhoda DeGarmo and her husband were friends and neighbors of the Anthony family. The DeGarmos were brave, freethinking members of the Underground Railroad which helped runaway slaves escape to Canada. If you choose DeGarmo, you will also learn about a woman who voted in the 1872 election with Susan B. Anthony. Mrs. DeGarmo's portrait can be seen on the third floor of the Susan B. Anthony House.

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7. Sara R. Adamson Dolley

If you choose Sara, you will be learning about an incredible woman! She was the second woman in the United States to receive a medical degree. That was an awesome achievement for a woman in 1851. Dr. Dolley worked as a physician to improve the life of women. She was a leader in local women's organizations, and was a avid supporter of women's rights.

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8. Anna Murray Douglass

Frederick Douglass' first wife, Anna Murray Douglass, was a hard-working woman devoted to her husband and her five children. Born to enslaved parents, she helped Frederick escape to freedom in New York City. Because her husband's work took him far from home for long periods of time, Anna was faced with raising and supporting their five children as well as managing a household. She was an agent on the Underground Railroad, welcoming freedom seekers into her own home. If you want to study a courageous woman who lived in dangerous times, choose Anna Douglass.

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9. Helen Pitts Douglass

Helen Pitts Douglass was born in Honeoye and was a teacher, writer, and activist. She also became Frederick Douglass' second wife. Mrs. Douglass was devoted to her husband and traveled extensively with him throughout Europe and accompanied Douglass to Haiti when he was appointed Minister to Haiti. She dedicated her life to preserving his memory. If you would like to learn more about this interesting woman, choose Helen Pitts Douglass.

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10. Emelene Abbey Dunn

Are you an artist or a person who enjoys looking at art? If so, you will find a soul sister in Emelene Abbey Dunn. Miss Dunn used oils, watercolors and pastels in her paintings which were exhibited in many places including the MemorialArtGallery. She shared her talent with students and teachers of art. During World War l, Miss Dunn worked hard to support the American soldiers.

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11. Helen Ellwanger

A little family history! George Ellwanger and Patrick Barry founded the world's largest tree and plant nursery which led to Rochester's fame as "The Flower City." Helen Ellwanger was the granddaughter of George Ellwanger. If you have an interest in saving and restoring old Rochester buildings, you might want to learn more about Miss Ellwanger who founded the Landmark Society of Western New York. She was also an excellent gardener (You can still visit her gardens!) and was involved in many activities in the Rochester community.

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12. Brenda Fraser

If you love theater, you will admire the pioneer spirit of Brenda Fraser, who was very active in the Rochester Community Players and the Rochester Shakespeare Theater. Brenda was an articulate politician, elected to the Rochester School Board many times. She served as President of the Rochester School Board, and was widely admired for her dedication, good sense, and superb leadership skills. In 1980 at the young age of 40, she died of a brain tumor. Her dying request was to be buried in her beloved Mount Hope Cemetery.

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13. Jean Brooks Greenleaf

Mrs. Greenleaf was an active suffragist leader in New YorkState. She was a close friend of Susan B. Anthony and Mary Anthony. Select Mrs. Greenleaf, the president of a political equality club, and see how she helped raise $250 to refurnish the Anthony home in 1891. Mrs. Greenleaf also was a special speaker at important birthday celebrations of Susan B. Anthony.

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14. Mary Post Hallowell

Some family history! Isaac Post, a Quaker, married Hannah Kirby, and they had a daughter, Mary. Sadly Hannah died when Mary was a small child. The following year, however, her father Isaac married Amy Kirby, Hannah's sister. So Mary's aunt became her new mother.  Like many of the other women at Mount Hope, Mary worked hard to abolish slavery and to improve women's rights. If you choose Mary Hallowell, a close friend of Susan B. Anthony, you will read about her home where Miss Anthony always felt welcome and where she always could go for advice and support.

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15. Sallie Holley

If you would like to learn about a woman who was nervous speaking in front of crowds at a time when women were "seen but not heard," select Sallie Holley. She lectured to large audiences about the evils of slavery. Years later, Miss Holley helped to establish and run a school for former slaves in Virginia, providing them with instruction in reading, writing, and vocational skills.

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16. Daisy Marquis Jones

Are you interested in making money grow? Then you might choose Daisy Marquis Jones, a private person, who lived modestly, saved her money and invested it wisely to accumulate a large fortune. If you were very wealthy like Mrs. Jones, would you spend the money on yourself, or would you do what Mrs. Jones did? She started the Daisy Marquis Jones Foundation to give back to the community with programs that help poor children and their families.

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17. Lucretia Miller Lee

Mrs. Lee is the woman to read about if you are interested in the life of an early pioneer woman whose family farm later became part of Mt. Hope Cemetery. Letters of the period describe the area's wooded forest, swamps, wildcats, wolves, bears, and gigantic mosquitoes who some compared to the size of grasshoppers. Mrs. Lee lived long enough to see trees cut, swamps drained and the loss of wildlife as more people settled there.

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18. Guelma Penn Anthony McLean

Guelma Penn Anthony McLean was the older sister of Susan B. Anthony. Most of Guelma's life was dedicated to her family, and she was very close to her famous sister. Even though Guelma was ill with tuberculosis, she left her sickbed in 1872 to register and to vote with Susan, an act of civil disobedience.

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19. Gertrude Herdle Moore

Gertrude Herdle Moore's father was the first director of the Memorial Art Gallery. When Gertrude graduated from the University of Rochester, she worked as her father's secretary. When he died in 1922, she became director. She served in that position for 40 years. During this time the Memorial Art Gallery received a worldwide reputation. She was very interested in education, and started the Creative Workshop where both children and adults could study art. What an incredible contribution she made to art in Rochester!

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20. Jane Marsh Parker

Jane Marsh Parker, a founder of the Rochester Historical Society, was a writer of poetry, articles, and books. Her writing was often influenced by her religious experiences. As a child, she lived next door to Frederick Douglass who was a lifelong friend. In the 1890's, Mrs. Parker wrote of her respect for Susan B. Anthony and the other leaders of the woman's movement, but Mrs. Parker did NOT support the suffragists' campaign and their methods to win the right to vote. Choose Jane Marsh Parker if you would like to study the life of a complex intellectual woman who was very involved in Rochester life.

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21. Margaret Augusta Peterson

Imagine you were a 23 year old nurse helping soldiers in a Rochester hospital during the Civil War. You were engaged to a young doctor, Harvey Foote, who was also working with wounded soldiers. Widespread diseases, such as smallpox, were common during this time. You may choose to read the sad love story of this young couple during these tragic years.

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22. Maria Porter


Maria (pronounced Mariah) Porter's residence was an important stop on the Underground Railroad. At times, she might have ten to twelve runaway slaves hidden in her home. Harriet Tubman was one of the conductors who led slaves to Miss Porter's home for protection before they escaped to Canada and freedom. Meet a brave Rochester hero by choosing Maria Porter for your research.

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23. Amy Post

Amy Post and her husband Isaac were Quakers. They welcomed everyone at their door, saying, "Won't thee come in?" In addition to their five children, one might see free blacks, runaway slaves, boarders and lecturers in their home. Amy Post once said, "Many a time I have crept out to the barn after dark with a basket of food and seen a black man or woman creep out from the hay, so frightened to take it." Select Mrs. Post to learn about an important friend of Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass and a courageous abolitionist.

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24. Nancy Harris Quackenbush

In 1818 Nancy Harris was born in a log cabin in the wilderness where Mt. Hope Cemetery would be opened 20 years later. When she was growing up, there were bears and wolves and rattlesnakes there. Nancy Harris Quackenbush lived long enough to see many trees cut down and roads built as the cemetery was established and continued to grow. If you would like to learn more about this pioneer woman who was buried on the site where she was born, choose Mrs. Quackenbush.

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25. Dr. Marcena Ricker

Dr. Ricker was Susan B. Anthony's friend and physician, taking care of the famous woman during the final days of her life and sending notices to the newspapers about Miss Anthony's condition. If you would like to learn about this dedicated doctor who cared for Miss Anthony's during her last illness, choose Marcena Ricker. After Miss Anthony died, Dr. Ricker continued her work with poor women in the Door of Hope institution which evolved into today's Hillside Children's Center.

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26. Georgiana Farr Sibley

Family background! Georgiana Farr married F. Harper Sibley who was the grandson of Hiram Sibley, a founder of the great telegraph company, Western Union. (These Sibleys were not the family who established Sibley's department store.)
Mrs. Sibley, a very religious woman, worked to improve the lives of people in Rochester and around the world. One example of her involvement occurred in 1964 during the race riots in Rochester. Mrs. Sibley had the skills to bring people together to try to solve their problems without violence. Choose Mrs. Sibley and you will learn about a courageous woman who said, "Always take a stand, the victory of evil is because people don't speak out against it."

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27. Catharine A. Fish Stebbins

As a young girl, Catharine Fish participated in antislavery activities. At age 23, she married Giles Stebbins, an antislavery lecturer. Mrs. Stebbins attended the first Woman's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls in 1848 and signed the Declaration of Sentiments. In 1872, she tried to register to vote in Michigan and was turned away. (This was a year before Susan B. Anthony's arrest for voting in Rochester.) Select Mrs. Stebbins, and learn about a woman of strong beliefs, a true activist.

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28. Margaret Woodbury Strong

Imagine traveling with your wealthy parents all over the world. Your parents give you an empty bag and tell you that you can buy anything and everything that will fit into the bag. Thus, Mrs. Strong, then Margaret Woodbury, became a grand collector of small things. If you would like to learn more about this woman who left her fortune and her collections for the formation of the Strong Museum, choose Margaret Woodbury Strong.

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29. Katharine Evans von Klenner

If you are interested in music and like to read unusual life stories, choose the Baroness von Klenner. A native Rochesterian, she met her husband, Baron Rudolph Ferdinand Auguste Mariavon Klenner, in Europe. He gave up his noble title of baron when he came to the United States to live with his wife where they were called Mr. and Mrs. von Klenner. Interestingly enough, Katharine decided to call herself a baroness after the death of her husband. Baroness Katharine Evans von Klenner spent most of her life as a teacher of voice and music.

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30. Lillian Wald

"Nursing is love in action, and there is no finer manifestation of it than the care of the poor and disabled in their own homes." So wrote Lillian Wald, a brave and free-spirited nurse, who dedicated her life to assisting the needy. You may be interested in a helping career such as nursing or a related field of medicine. If so, select Lillian Wald, a true heroine who founded the Visiting Nurse Service.

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31. Clara Louise Werner Ward

Clara Louise Werner Ward, whose nickname was "Clayla," enjoyed life and even more importantly, was involved in numerous political, civic and charitable organizations with the goal of improving the lives of Rochesterians. Mrs. Ward once said, "It doesn't take a lot of time and patience to help people. It just needs thought. Lots of times I can't sleep for thinking of ways to do what I think is important. And that is to dignify human beings.

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32. Emily Sibley Watson

As the daughter of Hiram Sibley, father of the Western Union company, Emily Sibley grew up in a wealthy family. Her life was spent helping others. She was a philanthropist. She built the Memorial Art Gallery in memory of her son, architect James Averill. Many of the most precious pieces in our art gallery were contributed by Emily. She was the benefactor of many young artists, the most famous being violinist David Hochstein. When this young prodigy was killed in World War I, Emily started the Hochstein School in his memory.

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33. Jessica (Judy) Weis

Is politics calling you? If so, choose Judy Weis, who was Rochester's first Congresswoman (1959-1963) at a time when there were only 14 women in the House of Representatives. Judy felt that women in politics "must work twice as hard, be twice as smart and twice as effective as a man before he will admit she works half as hard, is half as smart or is half as effective."

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34. Sarah Kirby Hallowell Willis

Sarah Kirby was the sister of Amy Kirby Post. Her first husband, Jeffries Hallowell, died after a six-year marriage. Later, she married Edmund Willis. If you would like to find out more about a woman who attended the first Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, select Mrs. Willis. Throughout her life, she gave generous amounts of money to help women in their fight for equality.

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